HIP & HIP PAIN TREATMENT

The hip joint is a ball and socket that allows the thigh to move in different directions. It also allows the hips to support the weight of the body. The hip joint resides inside a capsule containing lubricating fluid, which helps the hip move smoothly. Inside the hip joint is cartilage, the tough but flexible substance that lines the ends of joints. Ligaments keep the ball of the joint from slipping out of the socket.

Some of the hip conditions our orthopedic doctors treat include:

Dr. Bernard Kemker.jpg

Dr. Bernard P. Kemker, III

Director of Hip & Knee Services

Hip and Knee.jpg

HIP ARTHRITIS

Osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that tends to affect people as they age. As well as the hip joints, it most often affects the hands, spine, knees, and feet. It is associated with degeneration of the joint cartilage and with changes in the bones underlying the joint. The exact cause of osteoarthritis is not known, but genetics, stress on the joint, and local inflammation are thought to play a role.  

Osteoarthritis in the hip can lead to pain in the groin or buttock area, particularly on walking. Movement of the hip may also be restricted.

 

HIP FRACTURE OR DISLOCATION

A hip fracture is a break in the upper quarter of the femur (thigh) bone. The extent of the break depends on the forces that are involved. The type of surgery used to treat a hip fracture is primarily based on the bones and soft tissues affected or on the level of the fracture.

The "hip" is a ball-and-socket joint. It allows the upper leg to bend and rotate at the pelvis. An injury to the socket, or acetabulum, itself is not considered a "hip fracture." Management of fractures to the socket is a completely different consideration.

In general, there are three different types of hip fractures. The type of fracture depends on what area of the upper femur is involved.

  • Intracapsular fracture

  • Intertrochanteric fracture

  • Subtrochanteric 

The type of surgery generally depends on the where and how severe the fracture is, whether the broken bones aren't properly aligned (displaced), and your age and underlying health conditions.
The options include:

  • Internal repair using screws

  • Total hip replacement

  • Partial hip replacement

 

TROCHANTERIC BURSITIS

They contain a small amount of fluid and are positioned between bones and soft tissues, acting as cushions to help reduce friction. Bursitis is inflammation of the bursa. There are two major bursae in the hip that typically become irritated and inflamed. One bursa covers the bony point of the hip bone called the greater trochanter. Inflammation of this bursa is called trochanteric bursitis.

Another bursa — the iliopsoas bursa — is located on the inside (groin side) of the hip. When this bursa becomes inflamed, the condition is also sometimes referred to as hip bursitis, but the pain is located in the groin area. This condition is not as common as trochanteric bursitis but is treated in a similar manner.